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Hi, my name is Nicholette Lambert. I’d love to tell you I’m one of those “birth goddesses” who has a peaceful birth every time. (Like Giselle Bundchen inĀ More Business of Being Born: “And with every breath I thought, I’m going to meet my baby. I’m going to meet my baby.”) But if I told you that I’d be lying. I’ve had three children, all natural out-of hospital births and every time I’ve been like Salma Hayak in the movieĀ Fools Rush In: “No quiero, no quiero, no quiero! AHHHHH!!!!” All that being said, I’m a huge believer in letting birth take its natural course whenever possible. But I didn’t start out that way.

If you had told me ten years ago when I was in college that my chosen career would be a childbirth and breastfeeding educator, I would have laughed in your face. Before I started having babies I had everything figured out. I was definitely going to give birth in a hospital (it’s safer, duh). I was definitely going to have an epidural (what kind of sick person puts herself through unnecessary pain?). I would breastfeed for about a year (breastfeeding any longer is just weird and unnecessary). I went to Brigham Young University for my undergraduate years where a lot of the student body was married and having children. In the school newspaper’s opinion page there was a debate between several students who had given birth at local birthing centers, unmedicated with midwives and students who had medicated hospital births and it was pretty heated. I just could not fathom why these women who had had natural births were so gung-ho about the subject. Wasn’t one birth as good as another?

After I got married, I started investigating the thought of giving birth in a birthing center since I had heard it was less expensive than a hospital birth. That led to me investigating home birth as well. I knew both of these options would require me to go natural, so then I started investigating how and why women in the 21st century were giving birth with midwives and without meds. Suffice it to say, it was an eye-opening journey that led me to where I am now.

Another odd fact about me: I considered becoming a forensic pathologist when I was in junior high. No joke. I used to spend my weekends watching documentaries on cold cases and I was fascinated by how forensic pathologists could examine a body and find out so much about the victim and the perpetrator.

I am working on a Masters in Public Health with a focus on maternal and child health issues. I have my Breastfeeding Educator Certification through Birth Arts International. I am also in the process of becoming a certified childbirth educator. I love having the science background on birth and breastfeeding as well as the holistic side. I feel like it allows me to see things from different angles and find better solutions to problems.

This blog is where I publish my research to share with the birthing community as well as my thoughts on issues dealing with birth, breastfeeding, and maternal and child health. I will probably start teaching early in 2017.

I chose the name “Birth Multiverse” for this blog because I like to look at a topic from multiple points of view. It’s not unusual to find me citing sources from herbalist and Traditional Chinese Medicine texts along with medical journals. I also felt like “multiverse” would reflect the diversity of topics that I will write about and teach in my courses.

My husband and I have two beautiful boys and a new baby girl. Our oldest has a condition called myelomeningocele. We love to travel, hike, and watch movies. (We are BIG Disney/Pixar fans!)

Welcome!